Saturday, November 1, 2014

Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution by Keith R. A. DeCandido: Book Review!


Hello, everyone! I'm back with another Book Review! October has come and gone, and I figured what better way to keep the spooky spirit alive than reading a spooky book. Lately, I've been really into Fox's TV show Sleepy Hollow, and lucky for me, there's a tie-in book. It's called Sleepy Hollow: Children of the Revolution by Keith R. A. DeCandido.

The book follows the show faithfully, but it does not retell an episode. This is a new adventure never before seen on TV. It does take elements from the show, specifically from episode two of season one. In this book, a coven of witches try to bring back their leader Serilda of Abaddon who caused some mayhem in the previously mentioned episode. But let's see how this book stands without the television show.

The book follows the two witnesses, Abby Mills, a police officer, and Icabod Crane, a soldier from the Revolutionary War,  as they try to prevent the apocalypse and defeat the four horsemen in the little town of Sleepy Hollow. Serilda, a fiery witch hellbent on helping bring forth the end of days, is being resurrected by her coven, and it's up to Abby and Icabod to stop the ritual.

As a lover of the show, I really enjoyed this book. I found myself reading it whenever I could, which sometimes included class. That's horrible but not the point. I really enjoyed how it read. It flowed easily, and the way that all the events took place was fast-paced but not straining to read. It had action and mystery, and it was a really enjoyable read.

One thing that I really enjoyed about this book is the mixing of the historical facts and the realistic fiction. In order for this story to really work, every detail needs to work together whether it be from the author's imagination or American history. I think that they both flowed seamlessly in this story.

One thing that really erks me in books is multiple point of view changes. They just seem ridiculous in most books, and there always seems to be one point of view that is better than the rest. This book does this several times. My personal favorite is Icabod's point of view. It's just interesting to see him in the modern world when he has no idea what the modern world consists of. It's really cool. I hated reading scenes that went back in time to the Revolutionary Era. It was the one place in the book where I was ready to put it down. However, the saving grace was seeing some scenes from the culprit's point of view. I won't say who that is, but I think that the author captured both the evil witch side and the compassionate human side of the character. It something that I don't see in every episode of the show, and it was really nice to read.

Another aspect I didn't really like was the title. "Children of the Revolution" told me nothing of what the book was about. Maybe it could be a title for the overall series, but for this particular book, I would have went with something more pertaining to the plot. I'm hoping to see more books like this one, and I think it would be better for this series for the title to reveal something that is special to that particular book. 

So was this book mind-blowing and life-changing? No. It was a fun read and something I would recommend to a friend as a "in-between series" read. I think it's just the thing to get be back into reading for fun.  I'm giving this book a solid three and a half piles of ashes out of five.


That's it for this post! Comment down below on some of your favorite television tie-in books. Follow the blog by adding your email address to the Subscribe Box down below and off to the right. Follow me on twitter for up to date information on the blog and ridiculousness about my life @KK_Donna_Blog. Add me to your circles by clicking the Google+ button off to the right. Lastly, follow the tumblr dedicated to this blog, and you can find it here. Read on, lovelies! I'll see y'all next post!